ROTH or Traditional IRA: Which Is Best?

Roth vs IRAWhat makes the most sense for you, staying with a regular individual retirement account or converting to a Roth IRA? This is not a simple question so there is no simple answer. But here are some things to ask yourself.

 

An individual retirement account is a great retirement savings tool for most individuals. Created by the federal government, IRAs are funded during your working years.  In your retirement, IRAs may help supplement your Social Security benefits.

 

Your retirement savings begin with your annual IRA contribution. If you are under age 50, the current maximum annual contribution amount is $5,500, according to the Internal Revenue Service.  For those 50 years and older, you can contribute an additional $1,000. So if you turn 50 this year, you are now eligible to contribute $6,500. The contribution amounts are adjusted for inflation each year by the federal government.

 

With a traditional IRA, you put money away and deduct it until you withdraw from the account in your retirement. You pay tax on withdrawals. Converting to a Roth IRA means you pay tax on your old account up from it, and from then on the account grows tax-free. Opening a Roth without converting is done with after-tax dollars, meaning you already paid the government.

 

 

To find out which of the two types, traditional or Roth, is best suited for you, here’s a quick way to weigh the pros and cons of each.

 

The advantages to a traditional deductible IRA:

 

Tax Deductible.  Your contribution is deductible on your federal income tax return for the year in which you contribute.

 

Tax-Deferred Growth.  Your contribution grows tax deferred until you withdraw the money. This means you do not pay any taxes while your money is growing.

 

Limitations to a traditional deductible IRA:

 

Adjusted gross income (AGI) limitations.  The amount you can deduct is limited based on your AGI and, if you participate in your employer sponsored retirement plans. Your contribution may be fully deducted on your income taxes, partially deducted or not deductible at all.

 

10% Penalty.  This is imposed to encourage IRA owners to keep their money in their retirement account until reaching age 59 ½. If you withdraw any of your money prior to then, you incur the 10% penalty on the amount you withdraw. There are some exceptions to the rule: educational expenses, first-time home purchase and certain medical expenses.

 

Advantages to a Roth IRA:

 

Avoid taxes in the future. Roth IRAs grow tax-free. Therefore, no taxes are due when you withdraw your money.

No Required Minimum Distributions (RMD).  Roth IRAs do not require RMDs after age 70 ½, so your money can continue to grow with the potential for larger dollar amounts to leave to heirs.

 

Limitations to a Roth IRA:

 

AGI limitations.  For high wage earners (2017 limits – single filing over $133,000 and married filing jointly over $194,000), Roth contributions are not allowed.

 

Disqualified distributions. The earnings in your Roth must remain in the account for five years (known as the five-year clock) and until you reach 59 ½ years. A 10% penalty is applied to earning distributions that do not meet these requirements.

 

Always consult a financial advisor or IRS publication 590 before you make your final IRA decision. Making the correct IRA choice now can benefit you down the road in your retirement.

Kimberly J. Howard,CFP

KJH Financial Services

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What Can I Deduct on My Income Taxes

tax-and-deductionsTax time and deduction top of mind. Many legal deductions go unclaimed each year,  because most Americans still don’t know they exist. From cost savings for eyeglasses to approved deductions for airline baggage fees, no matter who you are, you’re likely to find at least one applicable deduction on the list below—and odds are you qualify for more than one. So read carefully, the savings can add up…

 

  • Job-hunting costs are applicable expenses that can be added to your itemized deductions. Did you spend out-of-pocket costs traveling to interviews or spend money stationery for resumes and cover letters? If so, deducting these items can make a big dent at tax time. And one doesn’t have to be officially unemployed to qualify. Searching for a better job, even while fully employed, is perfectly acceptable. Other applicable deductions include food and lodging for overnight stays, cab fares, and employment agency fees.

 

  • If that new job is your first job, any incurred moving expenses may indeed be deductible. To qualify for the deduction, your first job must be 50 miles or more from your previous residence. Those who qualify can deduct the cost of moving and, if you drove your own vehicle for the move, deduct 17 cents (2017) a mile plus parking and tolls.

 

  • While everyone recognizes that necessary medical items like wheelchairs and hearing aids may be deducted, few realize that eyeglasses and contacts also fall into the same category. While designer eyeglasses, or drug store magnifiers, may not seem like medical devices, the IRS does allow these deductions – a big cost savings at tax time.

 

  • Though we all known charitable contributions are tax deductible – one of the most common ways that Americans gain tax deductions – many less obvious acts of charity also qualify, Out-of-pocket charity expenses such as the cost of paint and poster board for a school fundraiser, or the cost of delivering meals or chauffeuring other volunteers can be deducted. Such mileage deductions may be totaled at a rate of 14 cents (2017) per mile plus parking and toll fees. Deductions will require a written acknowledgement from the charity involved.

 

  • Members of the National Guard or military reserve may claim a deduction for travel expenses to drills or meetings. In order to qualify, the service member must travel more than 100 miles from home on an overnight journey. Applicable deductions include lodging, meals, and 53.5 cents (2017) per mile plus parking and toll fees.

 

  • For those employees who have served on juries in the past year, jury duty may represent a taxable deduction. Many employers continue to pay their employees during the time of jury proceedings, but require the employees to turn over jury pay as a recompense for the time away. To even things out, you can deduct the amount you give to your employer. In such cases, the write-off goes on line 36 – the line totaling up deductions that get their own lines. Add your jury fee total to your other write-offs and write “jury pay” on the line directly to the left.

 

  • Airline baggage fees are another deduction that is rarely recognized by the American traveling public. All told, these fees can add up to serious costs. If you’re self-employed and travelling on business, you can add those costs in as approved business deductions.

 

  • In most cases, one can only deduct mortgage or student-loan interests if one is legally required to repay the debt. But if you’re a non-dependent student who still receives help from mom and dad, you parent’s generosity may help you at tax time. If mom and dad pay your loans, the IRS treats the money as a gift to the child who used it to pay the debt. As such, a non-dependent child can qualify to deduct up to $2,500 of student-loan interest paid. Be advised, however, that mom and dad can’t claim the interest deduction. Legally, it’s not their debt.

 

Just remember, in order to get the most out of your tax returns, you must stay as organized as possible, and do your research—no one likes getting audited.